WEEE Recycling

Compliant and Hassle Free

Regulations

Every year an estimated 2 million tonnes of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) items are discarded by householders and companies in the UK. WEEE includes most products that have a plug or need a battery. The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations 2013 became law in the UK on the 1st of January 2014 which include the main provisions of Directive 2012/19/EU and aims to reduce the amount of electrical waste being produced and to improve the environmental performance of businesses by reducing, reusing and recycling.


Computers for Disposal

Duty of Care

The Duty of Care imposes a legal obligation on an individual to adhere to a standard of reasonable care while performing any acts that could forseeably harm others and is the first element that must be established before proceeding with a “claim of negligence”. The term “Duty of Care” forms the basis for the Environmental Protection (Duty of Care) Regulations 1991 which imposes certain standards upon duty holders when dealing with controlled waste. Under the Duty of Care, waste holders are required to fulfill specific obligations (dilligence & prudence), mitigating potential impacts upon the environment and certain stakeholders, and thereby ensure the company disposing your waste is authorised to do so.


The Transfer

Transfering Waste to the Correct Person

Households are exempt from the Duty of Care where Local Authorities oversee the collection process. (Third parties acting on behalf of local authorities are not exempt from the need to register as a waste carrier).

Any waste holder may transfer waste to someone who transports it (a contractor). The contractor must be registered as a waste carrier with a regulatory authority (Environment Agency for England & Wales, SEPA for Scotland). It is important that the holder also checks that the waste is being correctly disposed of by the contractor (ask where it is being sent or delivered to).


Waste Transfer Note

Waste Transfer Note

The transfer of Controlled Wastes must be accompanied by a Controlled Waste Transfer Note (except where exempt- charities are exempt, as is waste when transported by rail or sea).

A transfer note should provide sufficient detail to describe the waste being transfered, how it is stored and the parties involved in the transfer (the holder and the person collecting the waste). The transfer note should also document where the transfer took place and registration details (carrier license) of the person collecting the waste.

Hazardous Waste Consignment Note

Hazardous Waste Consignment Note

The transfer of Controlled Wastes must be accompanied by a Controlled Waste Transfer Note (except where exempt- charities are exempt, as is waste when transported by rail or sea).

A transfer note should provide sufficient detail to describe the waste being transfered, how it is stored and the parties involved in the transfer (the holder and the person collecting the waste). The transfer note should also document where the transfer took place and registration details (carrier license) of the person collecting the waste.


Hazardous Waste Classifications
  • CRT monitors and televisions
    • Presence of Lead, Poly-chlorinated Biphenyls and Phosphor
  • TFT screens in flat screen monitors, televisions and laptops
    • Presence of Mercury Salts in the Backlights
  • Laptop Batteries
    • Presence of Cadmium, Lithium, Nickel and Zinc
  • Printed Circuit Boards
    • Presence of Lead and Mercury
  • Uninterruptable Power Supplies
    • Presence of Lead and Sulphuric Acid

Do you have equipment to recycle? What are you waiting for?